Harvey Childs

My name is Harvey Childs. I have recently finished my studies on the Foundation course at GCS, and I am going on to study a BA in photography at SCA. I regularly specialise in monochromatic photography, primarily digital. I’m also looking to expand my skill set into videography, which I have been experimenting with. It’s an honour to be offered a digital residency from the Mission Gallery and I hope this will help to showcase my work to a broader audience.

If you would like to see more of my work, check out my Instagram page @monomediaaa

In the meantime, I’m looking forward to showcasing some new material and I am truly thankful for the people at Mission Gallery and the Jane Phillips Award for giving me this opportunity.

Return to source.

Mic drop

I joke that my Mum put a crochet hook in my hand before I could even walk.
In reality I walked at 10 months and by the time my sister came along when I was Two I was already following so many women in my family by experimenting with wool and a hook. Crochet is my first creative love and remains the strongest. It pulls me back whenever I need comforting or reminding who I really am inside.
It felt right to finish this residency with something I love so much and has been with me for as long as I can remember.
I’ve used hooks and thread inherited from great aunty Nelly. Embodying the family heritage that taught me so much.
I’ve been full of mixed emotions finishing up this work. Excitement especially with the crystal spheres and how beautifully crochet lends to the shape and more sad than I realised I would be at it all coming to an end.


I want to thank all my tutors and technicians in UWTSD for the most amazing experience and their continued support. They have touched my life in a way I hadn’t expected and leaving them weighs heavy in my heart.
I felt at the start of this journey that I was in a no mans land. Now writing my last post I feel somewhat lost. But there is still so much to play for. A new course on the horizon with all the new learning and opportunities that will bring.

For all the future adventures, princesses and warriors,
dream big,
the world is ours for the taking.

Middle finger to the sky

And other ways to wear rings.

As this residency comes close to an end, the full circle of a ring feels right.
I’ve used wood, porcelain, wire and crystals. I am very much a hands on artist and enjoy the physical making process so much. I love the repetition of perfecting a design.
The rings we wear (or absence of them) and where on our hands we wear them, can be a sacred bond between people or a misleading impression of our status, a symbol of wealth or our association with a group. They say so much about us to the world.

Into The Woods

I’ve moved from fingers to wrists.
That feeling of being held by the wrist / restrained / trapped.
Taking inspiration from the angles and lines of crystals.
I love the contrast between the hard Oak and the soft Jelutong wood. It feels
like it echo’s the inner dialog of decisions needing to be made.
Working and shaping the wood, I am enjoying the process without expectation of
outcome. My mind is working behind the scene to evaluate my present situation.
The lyrics from Priority Boredom by Kae Tempest have been rolling around my
head these last few weeks. Pushing me to make sure I am being true to Me.

“Build up resilience, build up views

But you can’t build for long on a partial truth.”

Introducing: Claire Jones

Digital Residency Recipient: Foundation Art & Design, Swansea College of Art (UWTSD)

Digital Residency Dates: 01 – 30 July 2022

Mission Gallery is pleased to announce the 2022 Jane Phillips Award Digital Residency for Art & Design Students at Swansea College of Art, UWTSD. We are proud to be working with our partners at Swansea College of Art, UWTSD and keen to shine a light on the high standard of work being produced by students across all disciplines. 

This residency will provide an online space within the Jane Phillips Award website to display and develop work, ideas and research, while offering support and promotion through our networks. 

About Claire

Delving into what I want to see as an artist, I embody my ideas wholly. My working process allows the inter disciplinary process to guide the creative end result.

I am filled with emotional responses to my crochet hook, needle, sewing machine and biro like warm nostalgic feelings of an old friend and all the possibilities they create. Drawing on my surroundings, life experiences and a rich family history of crafting. 

The autobiographical nature of my work spans many themes.  The responsibility of my message and materials (often evident in the fragility of my work) weighs heavily on me. Crafting, refining and capturing this can lead to dark edge responses with pieces that are sometimes awkward and uncomfortable to look at.  This is a place of comfort for me, where I can embrace an inner feeling that people don’t always see when they look at me, allowing a bit of truth to escape.

Fight Me

I would like to thank Mission Gallery for choosing me as the winner of the the Jane Phillips Award.
Digital Residence for Art and Design Foundation at UWTSD Swansea.
It’s a massive honour. I am grateful and really excited for what comes next.

Embracing our worst self in full understanding that we are not only that but our best self too.

The foundation course I have just finished has supported me thru this journey.
Given me the confidence to believe in myself as an artist and renewed a desire within me for education and learning.

The knuckle dusters that won me this opportunity are made from wood and wool (crochet) with crystals.
Exhibited in my end of year show.
…Desire.

This residency is giving me time to develop and progress these designs. Experiment with materials and process.
I have been back to the wood lab in uni and picked up my crochet hook. I already feel a move from the outward powerful statement of the knuckle dusters to a more inward feeling.
I am in a no mans land now. Finished one course and yet to start the next. It is exciting and daunting at the same time. A natural time for self reflection.
The new work I have been making looks inward to Fight ME.
We enter into new stages / relationships / phases in our lives all the time. When it’s something we want, have even sought out and fought for, we are happy and give of ourselves willingly to it. Wholeheartedly blending ourselves with who or what this new situation is.


I have been exploring the part of these situations when I have realised that I am no longer who I was.
Sometimes I have been ok with that. Even more, I have seen that the new me has grown and I am proud of who I have become. Being back in education has brought out the best parts of me. I have fought the lazy, contented Me to bring out the Want More Me.
But other times I have lost so much of myself in situations that I hardly recognise Me and had to fight to get Me back.



It’s the moment that you realise how much you have changed and have to decide how you feel about it that I have been focusing on. Is it good for me? Do I want this? Do I like who I am now? Do I feel trapped? Am I bound to this situation?






“Build up resilience, build up views

But you can’t build for long on a partial truth.”

Blister Prints

Today I have been using my Gelli Plate and my blister packs to create some prints.

I occasionally use my Gelli Plate rather than traditional printmaking techniques because the process uses acrylic paint and it dries very quickly. If you’re not sure what a Gelli Plate is there are lots of video tutorials on Youtube that you can access to see how it works and all the different ways you can create some cool effects. Or you can look at this blog on Handprinted: https://handprinted.co.uk/blogs/blog/gelli-plates-1

I have got all different sized blister packs from different my medications. They all have different shapes, sizes and arrangements in the layout of the blisters. I used a feew different methods to create images on the plate.

These are the first two prints. I used an ibuprofen packet. I painted the blisters white, pressed them into the Gelli Plate and then placed black paper over and pulled the prints. I really love the result. The marks are like tiny foot prints, or finger prints. It reminds me of some work I have done in the past using morse code. I took the second print because there was still paint left over on the plate.

The Gelli Plate is quite a versatile method of printing and you can create prints with multiple layers of paint. After the second print there was still some excess paint left on the plate. I allowed this to completely dry and then overlayed the dry white paint with a layer of blue acrylic. I then pulled a new print. This print has actually managed to pull more of the original white markings off than the second print.

Below are three more prints using the exact same process as above but for these I used a Naproxen packet.

After those prints there was still some paint marks left! So of course I went in for another print! However very little detail of the blister packs came out but it is still a nice print.

Below are some more experimental prints which I did using other medication packages

Putting myself in the frame

I wanted to add some context so have printed some photos of myself (unwell) onto regular printer paper and used the same Gelli Plate process to make some mixed media prints. The results are below.

I am going to continue doing lots more prints from the blister packs.

A few weeks ago (with a little help from my friends Daisy Fisher and Sam Meredith) I drew an outline of my body. I think am going to use the outline as a guide to create some large scale blister print pieces using the Gelli Plate.


This is my final post for my digital residency. I have really enjoyed sharing my work and my thoughts on the Jane Phillips Award blog. Thank you very very much to the Mission Galley for this opportunity. If anyone would like to get in touch with me personally you can contact me via Instagram @saskias.studio or @saskia.fletcher

My first assemblage

Something completely new for me… I have started work on an assemblage – Things The Paramedics Left Behind. Initially I thought that I wanted the items to be displayed on a while background however when I tried it out only the blue and yellow items stood out. It wasn’t as defined as I wanted it to be at all, particularly for the plastic items. Instead I have tried out different arrangements on a blue tray. Here are the test photos of the different compositions.

Things The Paramedics Left Behind – tray test photos

I have tried all sorts of different arrangements of the items. Overall I don’t feel as though the assemblage works well within the confined space of the tray. I think the shape of the tray really limits the options of where the objects can go. It feels restricted and the squashed. I also dont think it reads well. Therefore I have tried putting them items onto a piece of reclaimed wood.

Things The Paramedics Left Behind – reclaimed wood test photos

I think the arrangements on the reclaimed wood work much better because if the proportions of the space. It reads better as a group and also as individual items. I plan to attach the objects to the wood with small picture tacks.

As this is my first venture into trying to create an assemblage I would greatly appreciate any tips or opinions because I would like the work to be powerful and thought provoking.

Ibuprofen Pop

I have been collecting all the things surrounding my condition. The other day I absent mindedly stacked my Ibuprofen boxes together and really liked the aesthetic of the pattern and colour because it was so charateristic of Pop Art. So I decided to do a little further investigation and experimentation with them. I started by using the scanner laying them out to create a repeated pattern. I then took this further and started to manipulate the shape and form of the packaging in many different ways.

I’m not sure yet if I am going to do any further processing with the boxes but I enjoyed developing a simple idea into a future possibility. Next I am going to start exploring all the different types of blister packaging.


Eye Manipulation

I have started quite a self indulgent project in recent weeks. I am documenting my own health. As a starting point I have starting collecting- objects, photographs, videos and my thoughts through creative writing.

I think this new body of work is going to be quite a departure from my work in the past because I am focusing on myself, but strangely I don’t feel self conscious about it. I think it’s because I am experiencing alot of unusual things, quite different from the life I used to have before I started experiencing health issues. Therefore it feels important to be recording it, reacting to it and responding in a creative way.

At the time that the below photos were taken I was unable to see anything due to eye inflammation. I am quite impressed that I even managed to capture myself in the frame!

Dabbling on Photoshop

I still consider myself a novice in Photoshop techniques but I quite enjoy the process of digital photo manipulation so I have had a go to see what results I could achieve. My aim was to try and highlight the white eye drops against the the rest of the face by changing them to black and white and then inverting them to make it look like black dripping out of the eyes. It didn’t really work, the drops just ended up grey. However, I enjoyed the process and although I didn’t achieve what I wanted, some of the results are quite cool and detailed.

Physical Manipulation

I have printed the photos so that I can also physically manipulate them. I want to blur out the images and I am going to try several different processes to see what effects I can achieve. I want to create a blurry veil to mimic my blurred sight.

I’m quite disappointed with the minimal effects that my processing has had on the photos. I was expecting some much more dramatic results. I think it is because I ordered very high quality photo paper.

Boiled – didn’t really do anything other than break down the strength of the back of the paper

Harpic toilet cleaner – I like this effect. At first I wasn’t keen on the blue colour, but now I quite like it because it fits in with the medical theme.

Margarine – hasn’t changed the image at all

Oil and salt – I added the salt afterwards because the oil didn’t really do anything

Plaster- I like this outcome but need to somehow seal it on the photo so that it doesn’t break off of the surface

Hand soap – only a slight darkening to parts of the image

Vasaline – has done nothing to the surface of the image. I thought this method would be much more effective than it has been

Wax – tricky to pour it where I wanted it to go – perhaps dipping the photo into the wax might work better

Bleach – had to be bleached twice because the first bleaching didn’t really do anything at all. I quite like it now that it has been bleached twice

Scanned

I put my manipulated images into my scanner and some strange things happened to some of them. They scanned in as normal and then when saving they went through an ‘enhancing’ process on the app and the colours washed out. Quite interesting… and I can only assume it is because the scanner uses light to capture the images.

When I couldn’t see I felt quite vulnerable and somewhat lonely. These were very new feelings for me to experience! I struggled alot with these emotions and it was the worst part of not being able to see. I am going to try and explore these emotions some more and try and get them to reflect in my work.

My obsession with cracks, …

… imperfections and things that used to be somewhere.

I am in Cheltenham this week. When I am in a new place I like to go out on foot and go exploring. I take my camera, a sketchbook and use the stimulus of my new surroundings to get inspired. Unfortunately this week my back and hips are extremely sore so I can’t manage the 2 or 3 hour walk I would usually undertake. However I have managed a very short walk to the Pitville Pump Room and a small part of the Pitville Park.

On my way to the Pump Room I saw some lovely cracks!
https://maps.app.goo.gl/q9JjUK4vgmCVr79z8

My obsession with cracks began in January 2021 when I spent time documenting a local carpark. Since doing that project I love (and seek out) all different kinds of imperfections and the ‘overlooked’.

Here are some compositions I photographed on my walk today.

I was also able to go inside the Pump Room. It was really quite beautiful inside, particularly the lighting. It was a calming and serene space.

I wish that I had been fit and able enough to take a full wander around the large expanse of Pitville Park. I did sit for a while and do a pencil drawing of some beautiful tree bark. For those that are interested I used a Blackwing Palomino pencil.

Monoprinting @ Cheltenham Science Festival

This week I am on the road at Cheltenham Science Festival. I have a station set up in the #Makershack

I am running a monoprint stall.

So…’What is a monoprint?’
Have a look at Tate’s definition here:

https://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/m/monoprint


I am a big fan of monoprinting because each print is unique and you can get unexpected results. I love that it is a highly experimental process during which happy accidents can occur and you can end up with a print you didn’t initially expect. It is also very simple and a lovely hands-on technique. During the day we have had lots of visiting schools coming to the Makershack and they seem to be absolutely loving getting stuck in and creating!

I am teaching a simple hand pressed technique that could easily be continued at home with materials which are easy to get hold of.

At my station in the Makershack we are using glass plates, ink rollers, water based block ink, newsprint paper and lolly sticks. This is our method if you would like to try it at home:

Inking up a plate with a thin layer of evenly distributed ink. Draw an image into the ink using a lolly stick.

The next step is to carefully lay paper over the plate and then hand press the paper onto the plate (circular motions with the palm of your hand tends to work best). Then carefully take two corners along the shot edge of the paper and peel off the paper to reveal your print.

With this method you will create a background the colour of your ink and the image you have drawn (the scraped away ink) will be the colour of your paper. If desired, after creating your first print, you can take a second print, called a ‘ghost print’, which will also be a unique print.

I have started to fill the windows of the Makershack with prints while they are drying, with anyone welcome to return to collect their prints during the week. It is a constantly changing art installation. If, at the end of the week, there are any uncollected prints I am going to bind them to create a book.

I am having a great time here at the Cheltenham Science Festival bringing the joy of printing to young and old and everyone else in-between!

My stall was featured in two of the festival highlight videos on YouTube Here are the links: https://youtu.be/GLGDG6tbUR4

https://youtu.be/iOMDVXNuFWU

The Super Ordinary And Some Rust

Firstly I would like to say thank you to Mission Gallery and the Jane Phillips Award for giving me the opportunity for this digital residency. I am an emerging artist and I am honoured to be here to share my work.

At this point in time I am just coming to the end of one body of work and I’m about to start focusing on something new, so this residency couldn’t come at a better time! I am going to be trying out lots of different techniques and ideas over the next few weeks and posting them here.

My most recent work has been to answer the question ‘What is Super Ordinary?’ Using this quote as a starting point- “How should we take account of, question and describe what happens everyday and recurs everyday; the banal, the quotidian, the obvious, the common, the ordinary, the infra-ordinary, the background noise, the habitual?” Georges Perec, 1973

I came to a natural stopping point in my project when I exhibited some of my work in the Graduate Expressions Exhibition at the Oriel Henry Thomas Gallery at Carmarthen School of Art.

With Every Fibre Of My Being (2022)

Stainless Steel Sink, Stainless Steel Wire Wool, Ink, Acetate

Saskia Fletcher

But when does an artist truly finish a project? The answer is never! Each time I come to the end of a project it becomes part of me, and it’s always ticking away in the background, influencing my new work in some way or another. For me there is always more ideas floating around on the periphery, something to add, something else I want to say or simply something that I just never got around to doing.

So with that in mind this is one of those things… early on in the project I had saved some metal kitchen shelving but hadn’t actually used them for anything. Last week when I was sorting out my garden I found them rusting away in the corner. So I thought I would try out a rust transfer technique I had seen on LuAnn Kessi’s blog. It is a process I have been meaning to do for a long time. You can find the post by LuAnn here: luannkessi.blogspot.com

I used her recipe to create some rust prints on some scrap fabric.

Here are the photos of the process and the results:

I enjoyed this process and I am pleasantly surprised at the amount of detail that has been created on the fabric. I like the different tones and the patchy quality of the outcome. Not all of the details have been picked up, and to me, the imperfection is what makes it all the more interesting. The two prints I made took time (4 days worth of patience!) to create and of course sunshine (which can sometimes be hard to come by in West Wales!) What I like most is that I have collected and captured a moment in the objects history- which is a one off and can never be replicated much like a mono printing – my favourite process.

My Super Ordinary project has turned out to be much more than just creating art. It has also created a new way of thinking for me. Now that I have come to an end of this body of work I know that this project is going to stay with me. I would like to thank Olivia Clemence for setting me the task of defining the Super Ordinary (it was daunting at first!) but it has changed the way I see the world. I will be keeping in mind the Perec quote above as I move forward into a new subject area… I will continue to question everything.

You can find more of my work on my Instagram page @saskias.studio

Introducing: Saskia Fletcher

Digital Residency Recipient : Carmarthen School of Art

Digital Residency Dates: 01 – 30 June 2022

Mission Gallery is pleased to announce the 2022 Jane Phillips Award Digital Residency for a Foundation Art & Design Resident at Carmarthen School of Art & Design, Coleg Sir Gâr. We are proud to be working with Carmarthen School of Art & Design, Coleg Sir Gâr and keen to shine a light on the high standard of work being produced by students across all disciplines. 

This residency will provide an online space within the Jane Phillips Award website to display and develop work, ideas and research, while offering support and promotion through our networks. 

About Saskia

Saskia Fletcher is a multidisciplinary artist who works in the fields of sculpture, fine art, printmaking, photography, film and installation. She works in a process led manner, working experimentally using a range of mediums.

Saskia is the current Graduate Resident of Foundation Art and Design at Carmarthen School of Art.

Images: Work by Saskia Fletcher

Digital Residency: Gower College Swansea

Mission Gallery is pleased to announce the 2022 Jane Phillips Award Digital Residency for Foundation Art & Design Students at Gower College Swansea. We are proud to be working with Gower College Swansea and keen to shine a light on the high standard of work being produced by students across all disciplines. 

This residency will provide an online space within the Jane Phillips Award website to display and develop work, ideas and research, while offering support and promotion through our networks. 

Residency recipients will be selected by Rhian Wyn Stone, Exhibitions & Retail Coordinator at Mission Gallery, Swansea and  Jane Phillips Award committee member.

Digital Residency Dates: 01 – 31 August 2022


About the Jane Phillips Award

Launched at Mission Gallery in 2011, the Jane Phillips Award is a memorial to Jane Phillips (1957-2011) Mission Gallery’s first director. The award is intended as a legacy to Jane’s passion for mentoring and nurturing talent, working with individuals at every level – offering opportunities to students as well as artists at the beginning of their journey. Opportunities that are further strengthened by working with Mission Gallery’s team, Swansea College of Art UWTSD and elysium gallery.

The award became international under Amanda Roderick, Mission Gallery’s previous director, and with further assistance by following directors Matthew Otten and Ceri Jones, plus an enthusiastic board, the award is constantly developing and changing.

Digital Residency: Foundation Art & Design, Swansea College of Art (UWTSD)

Mission Gallery is pleased to announce the 2022 Jane Phillips Award Digital Residency for Art & Design Students at Swansea College of Art, UWTSD. We are proud to be working with our partners at Swansea College of Art, UWTSD and keen to shine a light on the high standard of work being produced by students across all disciplines.

This residency will provide an online space within the Jane Phillips Award website to display and develop work, ideas and research, while offering support and promotion through our networks. 

Residency recipients will be selected by Rhian Wyn Stone, Exhibitions & Retail Coordinator at Mission Gallery, Swansea and  Jane Phillips Award committee member.

Digital Residency Dates: 01 – 30 July 2022


About the Jane Phillips Award

Launched at Mission Gallery in 2011, the Jane Phillips Award is a memorial to Jane Phillips (1957-2011) Mission Gallery’s first director. The award is intended as a legacy to Jane’s passion for mentoring and nurturing talent, working with individuals at every level – offering opportunities to students as well as artists at the beginning of their journey. Opportunities that are further strengthened by working with Mission Gallery’s team, Swansea College of Art UWTSD and elysium gallery.

The award became international under Amanda Roderick, Mission Gallery’s previous director, and with further assistance by following directors Matthew Otten and Ceri Jones, plus an enthusiastic board, the award is constantly developing and changing.

Off for a run!

Claire Densham, Jane Phillips Award Committee member and sister to Jane Phillips:

“My late sister Jane Phillips passed away, 10 years ago. Jane was the first director of Mission Gallery, Swansea. To celebrate the Jane Phillips Award’s 10th anniversary the committee are organising an exhibition of previous winners. We want to raise money so the success of the award can continue. 

I shall be running in the Swansea Bay 10k on the 19th September, so wish me luck and please donate. Thank you ❤️”

If you would like to donate, please follow the link here

Thank you for your support.

Image: Geometric Canvas (Green), Jane Phillips

A few words…

As we celebrate 10 years since the launch of the Jane Phillips Award, here’s some words from members of Jane’s family, Claire and Rob Phillips.

Kindly filmed by Martin Williams.

The 2020 Graduates

The Jane Phillips Award and Mission Gallery are pleased to announce the final list for the 2020 Graduate Showcase!

These successful graduates have the opportunity to show an example of their work within Mission Gallery’s curated retail space from 30 September – 31 October 2020. Work will also be featured in a showreel at Mission Gallery, a downloadable brochure, online on both the Jane Phillips Award website and Mission Gallery’s website and social media.

The graduates are:

Apphia Ferguson: Carmarthen School of Art

Imogen Mills: Carmarthen School of Art

Jess Parry: Swansea College of Art UWTSD

Keziah Ferguson: Carmarthen School of Art

Mattie Amatt: Cardiff School of Art & Design

Zoe Noakes: Swansea College of Art UWTSD

 

Apphia Ferguson

Imogen Mills

Jess Parry

Keziah Ferguson

Mattie Amatt

Zoe Noakes

Graduate Showcase 2020

Each year, the Jane Phillips Award showcases a curated selection of graduate work from Wales and beyond. It has taken many forms – and this year is no different. 

It’s a challenging time for graduates and we take our hats off to you – be proud of what you have achieved and let us celebrate your talent!

We invite applications from 2020 graduates – from jewellery, ceramics, textiles, print, mixed media, glass; any craft related disciplines. Successful applicants will have the opportunity to show an example of their work within Mission Gallery’s curated retail space. Work will also feature in a showreel at Mission Gallery, a downloadable brochure, online on both the Jane Phillips Award website and Mission Gallery’s website and social media. 

Application Deadline: 5pm, Friday 14 August 2020

Showcase dates: 30 September – 31 October 2020

 


 

Additional Information:

There is no fee to apply and up to 6 graduates will be selected. Each successful applicant will be asked to create a short video piece to introduce themselves, their work and making processes (no more than 5 minutes).

£50 will also be awarded to each successful candidate to help with related costs.

Please send a short statement about you and your work (no more than 250 words), up to 8 high-res jpegs (with an item list including title, description, materials and measurements) and an up-to-date CV to janephillipsaward@missiongallery.co.uk. Please include your contact details, university name and course.

All applicants will be notified whether successful by Friday 28 August 2020.

Successful candidates’ work will need to arrive at Mission Gallery from 15 – 18 September 2020.

 


 

To view the previous showcases brochures, please click on the links below:

2014 Graduate Showcase

2015 Graduate Showcase

2016 Graduate Showcase

2017 Graduate Showcase

2018 Graduate Showcase

Merged into Nature by Laurentina Miksiene

The day when all days felt like Sundays, we felt emptiness. All the connections with the world we lost in just in one day. At first we enjoyed the ‘’freedom’’… Finally, we had time for our families, we had time for a cup of coffee in the morning, we had time to talk or watch movies together, we had time for kids… 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10…. first you’re counting the days after the 20th day, it just doesn’t matter what day it is, what time it is. You don’t need to go sleep early because you don’t need to wake up early, to shower and rush somewhere…

Nature started to heal herself but how about humans. Sometimes I feel I’ve lost myself and I believe we all have a feeling that we have lost something we can not touch but can feel. All the connections with nature with other humans.

Only nature helped man endure the misfortunes of life and became support in daily life. The connection between man and nature can be found in literature, poetry, artworks, and photography. In my work, I sought the connection between man and nature. I was looking for a compromise between man and nature. That compromise is more uncomfortable than perfect. Through nature, we can see not only ourselves but also a reflection of our soul. Without this connection with nature, man mutates not only physically, psychologically, but also spiritually. In my series of photographs, I was looking for a spiritual connection between man and nature. A man comes from the earth and returns to it. The earth is the basic premise of our existence and its end. This vibrant, pulsating matter is open to both birth and death. A place where a clump can turn into life at any time, and life into a clump. Man is only a temporary particle of the earth cycle.

The photographs I printed on silk fabric to make them more flexible and weightless. I wanted to see the movement of fabric and structure of silk threads. The photographs look as though they are merged into the fabric like we are trying to merge into nature. It is like the fugitive testimony about man’s and nature’s compromise.

 

 

To view a short film by Laurentina, please click on the image below:

 

 

A project by Laurentina Miksiene

Modern society is surrounded by photographic images. The proliferation and ease of use of photography has made it an integral part of life, as a participant in society. Collection of photographic images in physical albums or on digital media – allowed people to archive their past. It has become a great human proof of past history that he can visually share with people close to him. Photography captures the visual reality and documents it – to capture what is real (visible). But what is that reality? What is her relationship to reality? How much truth lies in the image? The photographer must be responsible for presenting the situation in a fair and honest way, he can’t do manipulation of the technical image, but also can’t manipulate the emotional impact.

My portraits are not about how the object looks, rather it’s about how I feel he looks. I transfer onto the object my beliefs and vision but not my emotion. In art photography, some photographs are more suggestive and remain in the human memory, while others simply pass away, as in journalistic photography, some photographs simply represent an event and some convey emotion, mood, light. Photography has a dual function: it depicts the human exterior and describes his identity. To photograph my grandparents, I kept the vision for two years and only last summer I went to my country (Lithuania) and was able to do this.

Towards the end of the 20th century, Lithuanian photography experienced very important changes: some of the photography created at that time did not continue with previous Lithuanian photography traditions and generally did not match the usual criteria of photographic artistry. My favourite Lithuanian photographers are Antanas Sutkus and Vitas Luckus. Every time I  look at their photography I feel very emotional. I do not only see the photos I feel them. In photos with my grandparents, I was looking for natural emotion and to capture the photos with natural light. I wanted to show their relationship and loyalty, their love and their daily routine. I just had a feeling that I needed to do this for myself. To remember them like this. To remember their eyes, hair, wrinkles, hands, and voices. The photo where they are holding the hands of each other has been selected by Lensculture editors to be featured in the Portrait Awards 2020 Competition Gallery. Some of the photos were featured on Vogue Italia. I kept asking myself why it was so easy and natural to photograph my grandparents and landscape where I lived. And I think I found the answer – it is because of memories! I am connected to this place and these people. Most beautiful memories with grandparents, long conversations before going to sleep. I wanted not only to have digital memories of them I wanted to hear their voices so I recorded my grandmother singing. It is very important to me because we always sang together when I was a child. I still have a feeling that I haven’t finished the project and I plan to go back to Lithuania this year and take more photos. My grandmother will be 88 years old this summer and my grandfather will be 91; it is a solid age for them.

‘’In summary, we can say: The photographic image is a message without a code, it’s continuous. At the same time it is a connotative message, but not at the level of the message itself, but at the level of its production and reception. The photographic image is a sophisticated object selected, structured, built and produced according to professional standards – aesthetic, cultural or ideological.’’(Roland Barthes)

Images by Laurentina Miksiene

Penguin book covers

More to come soon

My final 3 book covers in one style. The style and construction I was inspired by is slightly visible here but mostly its a collage of hand drawings. Image traced images and shapes layered together creating my interpretation of a book  and what I felt.

Visible only defined by calculation and layers of scientific experiments .
Mix of biological, chemical, alien on the deserts of Arizona
That was my favorite one – not sure about this one now, did I take it to far from the original? The 4 square black pages represent the black characters of 4 friends. And one the weight of justice.

Underground world mixed with love, blood, time, and quantum mechanic calculations.

Finding my brand name and identity

This project is called “Me my self and I”. How do you see yourself? How do others perceive you? We all have our own self-portrait in our mind, but are others in tune with us? It’s important that others get the right message.

My name is spelt Grzegorz and no one from outside Poland is able to spell it correctly so I have crossed the “Z” here on the name to see how it looks.

Below is my strategy to develop end explore my ideas.

And some digital explorations of the name created with a strapline

 

“Go raw” will be