Blister Prints

Today I have been using my Gelli Plate and my blister packs to create some prints.

I occasionally use my Gelli Plate rather than traditional printmaking techniques because the process uses acrylic paint and it dries very quickly. If you’re not sure what a Gelli Plate is there are lots of video tutorials on Youtube that you can access to see how it works and all the different ways you can create some cool effects. Or you can look at this blog on Handprinted: https://handprinted.co.uk/blogs/blog/gelli-plates-1

I have got all different sized blister packs from different my medications. They all have different shapes, sizes and arrangements in the layout of the blisters. I used a feew different methods to create images on the plate.

These are the first two prints. I used an ibuprofen packet. I painted the blisters white, pressed them into the Gelli Plate and then placed black paper over and pulled the prints. I really love the result. The marks are like tiny foot prints, or finger prints. It reminds me of some work I have done in the past using morse code. I took the second print because there was still paint left over on the plate.

The Gelli Plate is quite a versatile method of printing and you can create prints with multiple layers of paint. After the second print there was still some excess paint left on the plate. I allowed this to completely dry and then overlayed the dry white paint with a layer of blue acrylic. I then pulled a new print. This print has actually managed to pull more of the original white markings off than the second print.

Below are three more prints using the exact same process as above but for these I used a Naproxen packet.

After those prints there was still some paint marks left! So of course I went in for another print! However very little detail of the blister packs came out but it is still a nice print.

Below are some more experimental prints which I did using other medication packages

Putting myself in the frame

I wanted to add some context so have printed some photos of myself (unwell) onto regular printer paper and used the same Gelli Plate process to make some mixed media prints. The results are below.

I am going to continue doing lots more prints from the blister packs.

A few weeks ago (with a little help from my friends Daisy Fisher and Sam Meredith) I drew an outline of my body. I think am going to use the outline as a guide to create some large scale blister print pieces using the Gelli Plate.


This is my final post for my digital residency. I have really enjoyed sharing my work and my thoughts on the Jane Phillips Award blog. Thank you very very much to the Mission Galley for this opportunity. If anyone would like to get in touch with me personally you can contact me via Instagram @saskias.studio or @saskia.fletcher

My first assemblage

Something completely new for me… I have started work on an assemblage – Things The Paramedics Left Behind. Initially I thought that I wanted the items to be displayed on a while background however when I tried it out only the blue and yellow items stood out. It wasn’t as defined as I wanted it to be at all, particularly for the plastic items. Instead I have tried out different arrangements on a blue tray. Here are the test photos of the different compositions.

Things The Paramedics Left Behind – tray test photos

I have tried all sorts of different arrangements of the items. Overall I don’t feel as though the assemblage works well within the confined space of the tray. I think the shape of the tray really limits the options of where the objects can go. It feels restricted and the squashed. I also dont think it reads well. Therefore I have tried putting them items onto a piece of reclaimed wood.

Things The Paramedics Left Behind – reclaimed wood test photos

I think the arrangements on the reclaimed wood work much better because if the proportions of the space. It reads better as a group and also as individual items. I plan to attach the objects to the wood with small picture tacks.

As this is my first venture into trying to create an assemblage I would greatly appreciate any tips or opinions because I would like the work to be powerful and thought provoking.

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Ibuprofen Pop

I have been collecting all the things surrounding my condition. The other day I absent mindedly stacked my Ibuprofen boxes together and really liked the aesthetic of the pattern and colour because it was so charateristic of Pop Art. So I decided to do a little further investigation and experimentation with them. I started by using the scanner laying them out to create a repeated pattern. I then took this further and started to manipulate the shape and form of the packaging in many different ways.

I’m not sure yet if I am going to do any further processing with the boxes but I enjoyed developing a simple idea into a future possibility. Next I am going to start exploring all the different types of blister packaging.


The Super Ordinary And Some Rust

Firstly I would like to say thank you to Mission Gallery and the Jane Phillips Award for giving me the opportunity for this digital residency. I am an emerging artist and I am honoured to be here to share my work.

At this point in time I am just coming to the end of one body of work and I’m about to start focusing on something new, so this residency couldn’t come at a better time! I am going to be trying out lots of different techniques and ideas over the next few weeks and posting them here.

My most recent work has been to answer the question ‘What is Super Ordinary?’ Using this quote as a starting point- “How should we take account of, question and describe what happens everyday and recurs everyday; the banal, the quotidian, the obvious, the common, the ordinary, the infra-ordinary, the background noise, the habitual?” Georges Perec, 1973

I came to a natural stopping point in my project when I exhibited some of my work in the Graduate Expressions Exhibition at the Oriel Henry Thomas Gallery at Carmarthen School of Art.

With Every Fibre Of My Being (2022)

Stainless Steel Sink, Stainless Steel Wire Wool, Ink, Acetate

Saskia Fletcher

But when does an artist truly finish a project? The answer is never! Each time I come to the end of a project it becomes part of me, and it’s always ticking away in the background, influencing my new work in some way or another. For me there is always more ideas floating around on the periphery, something to add, something else I want to say or simply something that I just never got around to doing.

So with that in mind this is one of those things… early on in the project I had saved some metal kitchen shelving but hadn’t actually used them for anything. Last week when I was sorting out my garden I found them rusting away in the corner. So I thought I would try out a rust transfer technique I had seen on LuAnn Kessi’s blog. It is a process I have been meaning to do for a long time. You can find the post by LuAnn here: luannkessi.blogspot.com

I used her recipe to create some rust prints on some scrap fabric.

Here are the photos of the process and the results:

I enjoyed this process and I am pleasantly surprised at the amount of detail that has been created on the fabric. I like the different tones and the patchy quality of the outcome. Not all of the details have been picked up, and to me, the imperfection is what makes it all the more interesting. The two prints I made took time (4 days worth of patience!) to create and of course sunshine (which can sometimes be hard to come by in West Wales!) What I like most is that I have collected and captured a moment in the objects history- which is a one off and can never be replicated much like a mono printing – my favourite process.

My Super Ordinary project has turned out to be much more than just creating art. It has also created a new way of thinking for me. Now that I have come to an end of this body of work I know that this project is going to stay with me. I would like to thank Olivia Clemence for setting me the task of defining the Super Ordinary (it was daunting at first!) but it has changed the way I see the world. I will be keeping in mind the Perec quote above as I move forward into a new subject area… I will continue to question everything.

You can find more of my work on my Instagram page @saskias.studio

Ragnarok initial concept notes

sb1This is the opening shot to the episode, setting the location and mystery the episode will follow.

  1. Ext shot, hill with trees, panning down hill
  2. Follows straight from one, shot up river with buildings in the background, camera pans down into 3
  3. Camera pans down into final position
  4. Camera onto body lying on slab stones/concrete, hold for a few seconds, let music well up and smash cut into next frame

 

sb2

*All p/in/p videos fade in and out*

Half profile shots of the two leads of the episode (a police investigator and the leader/ sub-boss of the biker gang suspected of the murder. Beside each are small videos showing actions of the upcoming episode to give a brief insight to the characters.)

  1. Shot of character getting out of car and talking to colleague
  2. Shot of character arresting/interviewing someone
  3. Shot of character room clearing/searching for clues
  4. Shot of character in a bar with drink (maybe a smoke too)
  5. Shot of character preparing chain/knife/knuckle duster
  6. Shot of character flexing with leather/denim vest on

 

sb3

Main title card for the episode, pic 1 is independent, while 2 and 3 are together.

  1. Black background, title fades in, followed shortly by episode title
  2. Series title fades in as a snowstorm starts to pick up (going from upper left to lower right), flows into pic 3.
  3. White background with vignette around border, episode title fades in black letters (possibly with episode count underneath)

Winter is coming- project notes

I have a new project to complete for my university course, called ‘Winter is Coming.’

The aim of this project is to create an opening title for a fictional anthology series called ‘Winter is Coming,’  with each of us creating a basic outline for an episode and constructing the opening title sequence around that.

Below you will find some preliminary notes I made about the project.

Winter is Coming opening credits

  • Nordic/Gaelic/Welsh noir inspired
  • Typically from the perspective of the police (most commonly dealing with murder)
  • Sometimes deal with corruption of government
  • Slow burn tension and drama
  • Opening title to be 60-90 seconds long
  • Can either be an opening scene with credits or more traditional opening credits (like a montage)
  • Winter is Coming- anthology series style

 

Episode style/story notes-

  • Cops vs bikers (Ragnarök, name for Biker Gang)
  • Corrupt local government official funding bikers (either through drugs or weapons)
  • Police pick up the trail after a body is found, suspected be a gang killing
  • Bikers preparing for a war with other gangs

 

Opening credits content notes-

  • Opening shot of dead body central to plot
  • Majority of credits are a close up of the two leads (separately) faces, half on show, over a black background while short clips from the episode fade in and out beside them
  • Leads= lead investigator and biker gang leader
  • Clips showcase the characters personalities through actions (such as arrests for the cop and beating someone for the gang leader)
  • End of credits feature the series title (Winter is Coming) and the episode title (Ragnarök) as a subtitle.
  • Alternative: Main title comes up, a “snowstorm” covers it over in white and replaces it with Ragnarök.

Wendigo shoot BTS

Here’s a selection of behind the scenes shots from a photoshoot I organised today (Sunday, 14/10/18) at Afan Argoed forest park, for my university project, taking influence from the Wendigo legend.